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2016 Global Insights Report: What Works & Why

2016 Global Insights Report: What Works & Why 1

Breaking Boundaries with Digital

Q&As with Four International Luminaries On Emerging Trends

Dispatch from Australia: Forging Direct Relationships with a Mass Audience

2016 Global Insights Report: What Works & Why 2Nicole Sheffield, CEO, NewsLifeMedia, owned by News Corp Australia, oversees digital and print operations for media properties that play a major role in the lives of Australians. The properties include: Vogue Australia and GQ Australia; News.com.au, which reaches six million people each month; and those that delve deep into verticals such as food, health, and parenting. All together, NewsLifeMedia content is accessed by 7.7 million people each month, representing 43 percent of Australians aged fifteen and older.

Sheffield shares with IAB how she develops direct relationships with audiences, the digital trends she sees on the rise, and her winning philosophy to constantly engage Australians and keep them coming back for more.

Q: What are your user’s expectations of advertising?

A: Users expect that any content is going to make their lives better. It’s going to add to the experience. For Taste.com.au, we did an award-winning campaign at Christmas called “Glad I Can Help.” Glad came to us with a problem: “We need to do a big Christmas campaign. We want to go 100 percent digital this time, but we feel like we always have to do television and other media. We want people to realize that Glad is not just the wrap for when you’ve got leftovers. We want it to be part of the Christmas experience.”

“Glad I Can Help” was an online helpline. The thing that I loved about that campaign was that it really was of great value to the consumer. You could send a question and literally within two hours, you would get a response. We had over 100,000 people send in questions. It was great in terms of advertising dollars and relationship with the client, but the most important thing for me is that digital allows you to have a direct relationship with consumers. And not a lot of media does that.

Q: Marketers are using digital to turn things and experiences never considered to be media into amplifiers of brand messaging. Do you, as a publisher, use digital to transcend conventional limitations?

A: Experiential is the biggest growth area for us, because as more and more things are digital, people still want the real world experience. Vogue’s Fashion Night Out is our biggest event and that’s a completely digitally-driven experience. We had 600 retailers participate last year and just under 200,000 people go shop. We have a brand called Delicious, Delicious.com.au, that has a dinner series every month where a chef will take over a restaurant. We are now selling out in eight minutes, and it’s $150 a ticket.

For our parenting site, Kidspot, kidspot.com.au, we’ve got an offering called Baby and Kids Market, which is basically a market for second-hand, pre-loved products. We run 60 of those markets a year, all around the country. Now they’re businesses unto themselves. The story, and the event, and the sharing, might be at a local level, but the message is on a national level.

Q: What do you see as the next big thing in digital for the Australian market?

A: Live is the next big thing that is going to take off for us. In July, we had an election in this country, and much to everyone’s horror—particularly the broadcast networks—the final political debate was held on the Facebook Live platform of our News.com.au. It was at six o’clock on a Friday night—a shocking time because everyone’s at the pub in our country—but we still managed nearly 40,000 interactions, compared to about 40,000 viewers for the debate on Sky News and ABC. We had around 160,000 views on the night of the event.

A national airline was at the office for two hours yesterday brainstorming with my team, and everybody was asking me about “live.” [Thinking about it from the perspective of our own brands], we do GQ Man of the Year, what’s the live component of that? I just used to tweet about it, do photos, and put up a video. You think about all those opportunities to strengthen those relationships with consumers to become involved in your event. It’s going to be a really interesting year ahead.

Q: To build relationships between consumers and brands, how important is it for advertising to be customized to a user’s existing media experience?

A: It depends on your product and your relationship with that customer. There are some instances where having highly personalized interactions is the game-changer for how your brand connects, [for example, on our health site].

There are other instances where people want to be in a sports field, watching a game together. It’s going to do more for my adrenaline and my experience and the rush that I have, and that’s the way we think about our news site. We feel like we are live all the time. Our audience is watching us, we’re playing the game, in the middle of the stadium, and we have six million Australians all around us, commenting on everything that we do. Whether it’s my journalists, my product people, or my sales team, everyone’s thinking “we are live, 24/7.” We are not just breaking news; we are the game.

So, how would a brand be part of the game? Or, if they’re not part of the game, how do they sit in the stadium with the six million people watching us? I’m all for personalization, and I believe it’s really important. But we shouldn’t underestimate the importance of mass.

Dispatch from Brazil: Navigating Revolutions in Media and the Car Industry

2016 Global Insights Report: What Works & Why 3Alexander Greif, General Marketing Manager, Citroën Brazil, is leading the marketing of the Paris-based carmaker through the effects of the digital revolution on advertising, and on the car industry itself. Two years ago, the majority of his team was dedicated to traditional media. Today, in response to the massive adoption of digital and social media in Brazil, his team is half the size and digitally-focused. As for tomorrow, he foresees tectonic changes to come, as buyers become more digitally-dependent, migrating their shopping behavior online, and even choosing digitally-enabled car sharing instead of ownership. With IAB, he speaks candidly and in detail about these changes.

Q: Over the years, how has the vibrant adoption of digital media and technology in Brazil changed what you do?

A: It changed everything. My whole media business model—even my team—changed completely in just two to three years. I used to have a six-person team, with four of them responsible for offline media: media budget, offline production, regional advertising in media, and so on. Today, we have a completely different approach, and a completely different structure. Now I have just three people, and for all of them, most of the focus is on digital. Our budget today is split 50 percent for digital and 45 percent for “open” TV, meaning those channels that don’t require a subscription. But [most] other automotive players still have their investment concentrated in open TV. I just use open TV today for launching cars.

Q: How do you spend that investment in digital?

A: On everything. We have two different business units. The first one is a branding business unit. Today, this business unit consumes around 30-35 percent of my digital spend. And the other business unit is the programmatic e-commerce unit. In this unit, I have one DMP, two trading desks with a DSP, two players focused on mobile for programmatic, and I have one player for video programmatic. Inside of the branding unit, normally I focus on reach and frequency players. Google [search] and Facebook are normally part of this, because they’re always on—it’s must do. Today, most of the sales that come from digital are concentrated on Google and Facebook.

Q: Today, for cars, as well as many other “big purchase” products, more of the sales cycle is taking place online. How does this impact your marketing?

A: When you notice the digital revolution taking place today in the purchase of a car, it’s very clear to everyone in the industry that the structure that we have today must be reborn. The roots of this industry are still in the oldest media and the oldest purchase [funnel]. We have a huge amount of dealers; we have the oldest salesmen style in the market. All these things must be reborn, because we have a maximum of 15 years with baby boomers and Generation X consumers. And the automotive industry was created for them. When you compare the oldest purchase funnel with the new one, the gap is really significant.

Of course, the automotive industry has already started working to change all these mindsets, and to prepare our sales team and our dealers to talk with this new kind of consumer. [But] today, it’s really hard to find a sales person already involved in this new digital native market. It’s hard to find someone that knows how to start the conversation through email, for example. This sounds like a simple [problem], but this remains difficult.

Q: Cars have become one of the first mass marketed items to become one of the Internet of Things. Have the interactive capabilities of cars changed the way you market them?

A: Definitely the car itself has become one of the first products, and the most interesting product, to include the Internet of Things concept. For society, interesting data and reflections could come from the interaction between cars and other technologies. When you have the Internet of Things inside a car, you can work with interesting social KPIs.

But, in terms of the business, this is not the point. The most important question today is how much do people want to own a car? In the past, many wanted to have a car. But when you think about the collaborative economy, in the near future, I cannot see the car there.

Q: You can’t see the car itself?

A: I can see the car. But not like a property, more like a tool. When you see the evolution of Uber, or when you hear people talking about the inconvenience of the car in an urban structure, it’s a central question. Because if this new, next generation of consumers prefers not owning cars, how do you handle all these giants in dealerships?

I have seen General Motors launch a car sharing service. I have seen, for example, Citroën in Europe buy car-sharing services. Maybe, these services will become more relevant than the product itself.

Dispatch from China: Satisfying Mobile Consumers Has Set the Bar

2016 Global Insights Report: What Works & Why 4SY Lau, Senior Executive Vice President, Tencent, and President, Online Media Group, leads the front edge of the digital mobile media explosion in China. Chinese mobile internet users spend 60 percent of their time using Tencent properties, with 35 percent of their time spent on Tencent’s groundbreaking social platform WeChat, according to Mary Meeker’s 2016 Internet Trends report. Through WeChat—which has 697 million monthly active users, according to the company—consumers can do everything, including purchasing movie tickets, paying bills, and even investing in financial products.

Here, Lau shares insights and strategies for succeeding in a market that’s been mobile-first from the get-go. Consumer expectations are high, Lau says: they expect immediacy, personalization, and for everything to be at their fingertips.

Q: Tencent is a leader in mobile digital media in China. Can you describe the mobile user in China and their expectations of advertising?

A: Today, China is highly mobile. China’s leap-frogging of fixed-line technology has created the world’s largest mobile market in terms of its user base. The number of mobile users in China exceeded 1.3 billion at the end of 2015, and 29.6 percent of those are 4G users.

The way we see it, people are mobile—not their devices. Therefore, practically all of our products take this into consideration. We are now in an era where everything is connected, and the tool of connection is the mobile internet. Therefore, consumers now expect more value, more control, and more choice. They demand services to provide greater involvement, customization, personalization, and mobility—with immediate results.

When we look at the advertising experience itself, advertisements are becoming more relevant than ever: the boundary between content and advertisements is blurring. An advertisement is not just “an advertisement,” but represents useful information for consumers, powered by the rise and application of content-based recommendation algorithms and highly-customized media services. Those providing the best content and the most useful information will create stronger bonds between users and brands.

Q: What have you learned from WeChat’s expansion into services?

A: Originally, WeChat was a mobile messaging service. But it has evolved into a fast-growing mobile social platform. Moreover, WeChat is positioned as an essential vehicle for Tencent’s strategy to connect everything, leading to a new digitally-connected lifestyle.

Tencent only performs two roles: connector and content provider. Platforms such as WeChat that serve as connectors must have content flowing on them. Content is not only about text and audio, but all the things users spend their time doing.

For example, as a social media platform, WeChat is the home of many “official accounts,” ranging from accounts of celebrities, banks, media outlets, and fashion brands, to hospitals, drug stores, car manufacturers, internet startups, and more. These “apps within apps” can access APIs for payments, location, direct messages, user ID, and more. Is it social media? Is it an e-commerce platform? The answer to both is “yes.”

Looking into the future, Tencent will continue to open its arms to partners in order to construct a win-win ecosystem together.

Q: How has the evolution of digital technology and its rapid adoption changed your work?

A: With the evolution of technology, the interaction between people, the interaction between people and content, and the impact of one consumer on another have changed dramatically.

  1. In the Media 1.0 era, content was connected to content;
  2. In the Media 2.0 era, people were connected to people;
  3. And in this Media 3.0 era—where everyone can be a media outlet—people and content are connected in both ways, featuring customized, personalized content, and multi-dimensional connections.

First, in this Media 3.0 era, content will [take on a] new life—call it Smart Content, if you like—with mobile entertainment powering growth. Second, as technology evolves further, it will become smarter with the incorporation of artificial intelligence and machine-learning algorithms, to name just two. This will result in the curation of content tailor-made for specific consumer needs.

Q. What trends are you noticing in the Chinese market?

A: 1. The evolution from customer-centric to customer-obsessive. As noted, consumers now expect more value, more control, and more choice. This is not about customer-centricity or even thinking “the customer is always right.” Customer obsession is the relentless focus on calibrating business processes to deliver seamless, connected experiences at each and every customer interaction point.

2. The lines between apps, e-commerce, and social are blurring. Take the omni-channel trend, for instance. Business owners now expect that same omni-channel experience from other businesses—corporate accounts on e-commerce sites, and social networks becoming B2B demand-generation platforms. WeChat “official accounts,” such as those for companies or celebrities, are a great example of this.

3. Expect the B2B and B2C sectors to begin looking increasingly alike. Marketing to a business and marketing to an individual are similar, in that fundamental marketing principles apply to both. Both require that value be demonstrated to the target market. Demands for convenience and immediacy are not restricted to either sector. Today, the need for speed that we see in B2C often trumps the traditional B2B reliance on longer-term, relationship-based transactions.

Dispatch from EMEA: Creativity at the Limits of Globalization

2016 Global Insights Report: What Works & Why 5Ian Haworth, Executive Creative Director UK & EMEA, Wunderman, directs the development of creative that must be meaningful to consumers everywhere from Spain to Saudi Arabia. While he says, “Emotional connection is at the heart of everything,” he admits that the connecting points between humans that transcend culture are actually quite few. Haworth must keep his finger on the pulse of the subtle, cultural differences between audiences, and the digital trends prevalent in each arena. With IAB, he takes a step back and reflects on the insights and themes that influence his decisions.

Q: Around the world, digital is turning things and experiences into media that were never considered to be media before. Have you noticed this or participated in it?

A: Yes, I have noticed that. There’s a constant strive for originality, to stand out. And standing out is really very difficult. We did something very interesting as a network, called “Coins of Hope,” to increase awareness about missing children in Europe. The actual idea wasn’t digital at all. We got the European government to re-mint one million 2 coins, and the head on the back of the coin is actually missing children. That’s an idea with a long tail, because that’s going to be in circulation until the coins run out. But if you just left it to traditional media, the amplification would disappear. The social nature of the campaign is really amplifying it.

So those things are happening, where you are using non-traditional, non-digital channels to launch massive digital campaigns. The pitfall is that they are sometimes difficult to produce, like trying to convince the European Parliament to reprint a coin. The advantage—when you pull it off—is that it’s massively differentiating.

Q: You oversee creative spanning quite a large and varied portion of the globe. How do consumers’ relationships with digital media vary across the regions under your purview?

A: In the more mature markets, it’s pretty constant. There’s paid media and tons of social content. A lot of it is fairly similar in terms of digital interaction. However, what tends to happen in the emerging markets is that they leapfrog to mobile first. That happened a lot in the Far East. Sometimes you see a lot of heavily mobile-first stuff, but equally some of the other media is still very traditional. Smartphone penetration is huge—huge—particularly in the Middle East. They jumped straight there.

Q: What are the most important considerations for advertisers who want to execute a global campaign in multiple, distinct markets?

A: There are natural connecting points for every human that transcend culture, but they’re relatively few. For me, the biggest consideration is cultural. What is the cultural state in that country, be it political or religious? Are they rich? Are they poor? Have they just had a war? Is their economy good? I remember once working for a bank. This was in Eastern Europe, Russia at the time, where they were still primarily cash economies. People didn’t trust cards, and this was not that long ago. [You also have to think about] media consumption. What media is consumed most in those markets? Data is a massive consideration, because privacy laws are different all over the world. You must also consider the role of a brand in that culture. Certain brands, they may be seen as prestigious in one country, yet not very prestigious in others. All of those are considerations.

Q: How do you handle it when two very different cultures could be accessing the same content?

A: Right, the culture in Saudi Arabia for example, is very different than in Holland, and you may have to do a campaign that covers both those countries. You need to know, are there any restrictions to access? Unless a country has restrictions on how their people use the internet, there’s not a lot that you can do about it. But a lot of content is geo-targeted. I go on YouTube, and it’s geo-targeted to where I am. But in principle, you can still go access it. For certain paid channels, you can really control how it’s seen, too. Understand that whatever you do, it’s truly a global campaign. You’re not going to do something that you know is going to completely alienate [your audience] somewhere.

The worst thing is going in blind. I’ve come across brands that think everyone’s the same. Like in the Middle East, ok, they’ve got loads of fancy cars. It looks very Western in some ways. It is so not Western in others. Even within the Middle East region there are differences. For example, the differences between the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia are massive, and you need to understand all of that.

Q: Is there anything that connects all of your audiences?

A: Emotional connection is still at the heart of everything. Absolutely everything. The way you access that emotion and the way you tap into it, what content you use to create that, that’s different. The power of driving emotional connection is still a fundamental truth, because you’re still talking to human beings.

What Select Campaigns From Around The World Tell Us About Interactive Advertising Today

Digital on the Streets: Local Executions Expanding Far Beyond Their Physical Limitations

Airmail for Volkswagen

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Airmail for Volkswagen


WIEN NORD WERBEAGENTUR GMBH
OPEL
GOLD, BEST DIGITAL CAMPAIGN
AND GOLD, BRANDED CONTENT
BEST IN SHOW CREATIVE
IAB AUSTRIA WEBAD 2015

Opel, a German car manufacturer, used digital media—and the threat of pigeon poop—to invade the world’s largest event for its longtime rival, Volkswagen, where 170,000 fans gathered to celebrate their brand. How’d Opel do it? Virtually, by taking over mindshare. In the weeks before the event, Opel spread a rumor that it was training pigeons to relieve themselves only on Volkswagens at the convention. Fake “leaked” videos of pigeons being trained for this noble task were circulated online, and national media covered the scare. Event attendees believed the hype, and even showed up with homemade car covers and repellant sprays. But in reality, if any pigeon did happen to “go” on top of a Volkswagen, it was pure chance. The only birds Opel brought to the convention were white doves as a sign of peace.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • 3.8 million people reached by Opel’s viral effort.
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SingStar Taxi

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SingStar Taxi


TBWA
SONY PLAYSTATION BENELUX
IAB BELGIUM MIXX AWARDS 2015

Sony PlayStation rebooted a limousine to bring its new SingStar PlayStation 4 game out of the console and into the lives of gamers, and into the busy streets of Belgium’s biggest cities. The company’s goal was to boost awareness and sales of the new SingStar game, SingStar songs, and the PS4 SingStar bundle. Here’s how it worked: Sony rented a supersized limousine and added the video game, two microphones, rooftop speakers to broadcast the singers inside, and a bright taxi sign. Anyone who wanted a ride could hop in, with players at home hailing the taxi by tweeting or commenting on Facebook. But the ride wasn’t free. Users had to pay by singing a song. When users stopped singing, the car stopped, too. To extend the event beyond the street, performances were shared on users’ Facebook pages, and the best performances were edited into a video on PlayStation’s YouTube channel.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • PlayStation Benelux exceeded their sales target by 12%
  • SingStar awareness in Belgium rose by 7%, to 82%
  • Approximately 2,000 consumers sang in the SingStar Taxi
  • The campaign generated more than 200,000 impressions on the PlayStation Facebook page
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去我不一样的 (My Own Special Journey)

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去我不一样的 (My Own Special Journey)


BBDO
VISA
GOLD, MEDIA MARKETING AWARD—WIRELESS
GREAT WALL OF CHINA ADVERTISING AWARDS 2015

Visa turned its data about merchants into a bike tour for young Chinese travelers visiting in Melbourne, Sydney, and Seoul. It all started with this insight: Young people wanted to authentically experience the culture and life of the cities that they traveled to—and Visa wanted them to choose to pay using Visa over China UnionPay cards. So Visa built a series of pop-up bike rental kiosks in the cities Chinese youths gravitate to, and equipped each bike with an app directing riders to desirable spots where Visa was accepted. Included in each app was technology to share their experiences on social media. To attract participants, Visa developed a fictional TV character who critiqued undesirable “luxury” travel experiences, and produced online display ads, social media content, print ads, and videos. For those not traveling during the campaign, they could take a virtual ride on the rental bikes online.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • Chinese travelers’ use of Visa increased 40%
  • The experience attracted 7,486 travelers
  • The experience attracted 7,486 travelers
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魔力变幻跑 (Magic Night Run)

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魔力变幻跑 (Magic Night Run)


CHEIL BEIJING, CHINA
C’ESTBON/MULENE
GRAND PRIX INTERACTIVE
ONLINE ADVERTISING CREATIVE AWARD
GREAT WALL OF CHINA ADVERTISING AWARDS 2015

To attract more young consumers, Mulene, a sports energy drink, decked out T-shirts with LED motion graphics that activated from body heat. Then they invited local youths to wear them for organized night runs. But the effects of the campaign could be seen far beyond running paths, thanks to the integration of mobile. Consumers registered to receive a shirt by downloading an app. Once they received their shirts, they could upload pictures of themselves to their mobile devices and instantly share them via the microblogging service Weibo. The more the users shared, the more likely they were to receive a coupon for free Mulene products—and it resulted in an increase in the number of people who purchased Mulene products.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • Sales increased 17% over the prior period
  • During the one month campaign, 2,371 people participated, and Weibo received 119,075 forwards and 346,119 comments
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Urban Adventures #cuttypaizei

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Urban Adventures #cuttypaizei


4 WISE MONKEYS
CUTTY SARK
IAB GREECE MIXX AWARDS BEST IN SHOW
GOLD IN EXPERIMENTAL & INNOVATIVE CAMPAIGN
GOLD IN CROSS-MEDIA INTEGRATION
GOLD IN DIGITAL CHANNELS INTEGRATION
GOLD IN NATIVE ADVERTISING & PR CAMPAIGNS

In Greece, whiskey had an image problem—it was an old man’s drink. So whiskey brand Cutty Sark created a virtual urban museum in Athens, as well as an abundance of content about urban life—all under the tagline “dare to discover”—to attract 18- to 35-year-olds to the brand. Street art, indie stores, and hip hangout spots were all depicted on a digital map. At the physical locations, a Cutty Sark sticker with a QR code linked users to exclusive content about the exhibit and its creators. The brand also organized city walking tours complete with a Cutty Sark after-party. All of the content—videos, blog posts, and photos—lived on the website urbanadventures.gr. The experience as a whole was promoted through social media with the hashtag #cuttypaizei and through a rich digital campaign. Cutty Sark dared to re-establish its brand by integrating digital media into the streets of Athens, and the results prove its adventurousness was worth it.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • 126,294 visitors generated 283,207 page views
  • The video collection attracted 390,000 views
  • Research showed that Cutty Sark was a “whiskey you would be proud to be drink” up 4%, and “a meaningful brand” up 13%
  • The brand enjoyed a 4.8% increase in market share in supermarkets
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Social Channels

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Social Channels


KING JAMES GROUP
CITY OF CAPE TOWN
GOLD, IAB SOUTH AFRICA BOOKMARK AWARDS

The City of Cape Town courageously used digital to turn itself into marketing media, in order to bring to life the city’s new tagline, “Making Progress Possible. Together.” It accomplished this feat by reinventing the way it responded to residents concerns, such as reports of water main breaks. To begin, it established a large team that could respond quickly to residents, and it empowered them with a new, simple escalation process involving the city’s different departments. Then the city invited people to report their problems via social media. Anyone online could track the reports of problems and the team’s responses, and the resulting transparency became an essential source of information, especially during a period when wildfires were spreading across the peninsula. As a result, the campaign turned the city’s biggest problems into wins for the city itself.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • The city enjoyed a 20% increase in positive sentiment
  • It generated 250,000 engagements a month, an increase of 252%
  • An average of 904 service requests were answered each month, an increase of 640%
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Hologramas por la Libertad (Holograms for Freedom)

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Hologramas por la Libertad (Holograms for Freedom)


DDB ESPAÑA
NO SOMOS DELITO/WE ARE NOT CRIME
IAB SPAIN INSPIRATIONAL FESTIVAL GRAND PRIX
GOLD – VIRAL VIDEO
GOLD – EXTERIOR DIGITAL
GOLD – CROSS-MEDIA CAMPAIGN

Local activists used digital media and technology to outwit a new “gag law” penalizing public protests and get their call for freedom of speech heard, not only by Congress, but by hundreds of millions of people around the world. How? With a protest by hologram. More than 17,000 people participated in a holographic march on Congress, and yet not one person stepped foot onto the actual street, risking disciplinary action from law enforcement. Would-be protestors went to the website Hologramas por la Libertad (Holograms for Freedom), wrote messages, uploads their images, and recorded their “shouts.” Organizers then used this media to build out their image of the march. On April 15, 2015, the event took place, a light shining out across the dark city night, a message too powerful to be silenced.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • The campaign attracted 800 million impressions globally, and 400 million impressions on Twitter
  • More than 330,000 people signed the companion petition
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Connected Candles #mittljus (#mylight)

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Connected Candles #mittljus (#mylight)


STARCOM MEDIAVEST GROUP SWEDEN
THE CHURCH OF SWEDEN
SWEDEN IAB MIXX AWARDS BEST CAMPAIGN - BRANDING 2016 AND CRISTAL FESTIVAL, 2015 MEDIA BEST USE OF CULTURAL CAMPAIGN SAPPHIRE (SILVER)

From one person’s click to one candle lit—the Church of Sweden modernized its communications with worshippers, and helped tens of thousands of people to express their grief after losing a loved one. Here’s how they did it. Trees of LED candles were placed all over busy public places in Sweden. Through a mobile app, users could light a candle in memory of a loved one and write messages about their thoughts and feelings to share with the community. After a candle was lit, an image highlighting the person’s candle was sent back to them for sharing. To launch the campaign, the team used PR with paid and unpaid influencers, and produced films profiling three people dealing with loss, which were socialized and targeted to key audiences. The campaign only lasted six days, but it made a lasting impression.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • Approximately 36,000 candles were lit from 104 countries
  • The video collection attracted 390,000 views
  • Social media interactions with The Church of Sweden increased more than 200%, with more than 24,000 daily contributors
  • The perception of the church as modern rose from 9% to 60%
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Sessiz Vitrin (Silent Window)

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Sessiz Vitrin (Silent Window)


MANAJANS/JWT
UNILEVER/AXE BLACK
GOLD – BRANDED CONTENT
GOLD – OUT OF HOME
IAB TURKEY MIXX AWARDS 2016

For this local activation of an international campaign urging people to “bring the quiet” to launch Axe Black, Axe produced live rock concerts behind soundproof glass in Turkey. But it’s what the team did with digital that really created the spectacle. It all started with the physical. Axe built a public-facing, soundproof music studio in a loud area of Istanbul, and invited six popular bands to perform. Then it let fans know about the shows, by using iBeacon to send out push notifications. But when the fans arrived to see the band, they couldn’t hear a thing. To listen, viewers had to connect to Axe WiFi and put on their headsets—and then, once connected, all social media was silenced on their phones, creating a quiet that reverberated far beyond the stage.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • The campaign was a trending topic for 186 minutes
  • The outdoor execution reached six million people
  • Research showed that Cutty Sark was a “whiskey you would be proud to be
  • Axe Black was the best selling Axe product during the campaign
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Nike Font

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Nike Font


PUBLICIS IMPETU
NIKE
GOLD IN MOBILE PLATFORMS AND SILVER IN OOH, IAB URUGUAY MIXX AWARDS

To promote the Nike+ app, Nike reinvented user-generated content, turning users’ running paths into media itself. Prior to a Nike 10K run, Nike challenged runners in Uruguay to train by running courses that drew letters on their digital map. The response? Nike+ users ran 4,389km (2,727 miles) in the shapes of letters. The best letters were then used to form an alphabet. On race day, Nike used the new font to post motivational messages across the racecourse. It was a campaign created by runners to challenge and inspire runners—and incidentally, increased the use of the Nike+ app, too.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • Active members of the Nike+ app increased 58%
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Super-Powered Advertising: Shattering Expectations Through Innovative Use of Cutting-Edge Technologies

T-Mobile Wie-ich-will (How I Want It/JUHU!)

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T-Mobile Wie-ich-will (How I Want It/JUHU!)


MEDIACOM
T-MOBILE
BEST IN SHOW/GOLD, BEST CROSSMEDIA CAMPAIGN, BEST IN SHOW MEDIA IAB AUSTRIA WEBAD 2015

Contextualized mobile interstitials. Naturally integrated page takeovers. To tell consumers all about its new program for easy phone upgrades, T-Mobile weaved its “How I Want It” message into content, using innovative and highly-interactive forms of traditional digital advertising. On a weather site, users could pick the weather they wanted, and the ad would apply the changes to the site’s weather map. Through website takeovers, users could change the background color of the site and implement other design changes, making the site just how they wanted it. On Shazam, T-Mobile placed ads targeted to when the app couldn’t find the song: “Although no hit, it's a great deal,” the ad said. In mobile games, T-Mobile integrated ads into new-level announcements. The results of all this integration were outstanding, giving T-Mobile just what it wanted.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • Display ads earned a click-through rate of 0.46%
  • The click-through rate for mobile ads was up to 4.29%
  • Advertising sympathy rose by 4.1%
  • The campaigns resulted in a rise of 90% in customer acquisition
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True Wetsuits

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True Wetsuits


TBWA/HAKUHODO
QUIKSILVER JAPAN
GOLD AND SILVER, CANNES LIONS 2015

The star of this campaign is a wetsuit designed to look like business attire. It came in three designs—a black suit, a blue suit, and a tuxedo. Quiksliver wanted to help all those who gave up surfing for their jobs get back in the water. But behind this innovative fashion product and outstanding consumer insight is the expert use of digital media. Each suit came with a “pen” in its pocket that could be used to send a pre-written excuse email telling the office you’re going to be late. Quiksilver.co.jp not only sold and featured the wetsuits, but included a wave report that linked the next day’s surf report to the stock market.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • The 2015 model sold out three days after its launch
  • Orders are backed-up through 2016
  • Quiksilver attracted over 120 million impressions globally
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Solo Goodie Bag

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Solo Goodie Bag


TRY, WITH APT / STREAM / PRAVDA / OMD / YELLOW BANANA
SOLO
GOLD IN MOBILE, 2016 GULLTAGGEN AWARDS

To stand out in a crowded, declining market and boost sales to boot, Solo created an app that made its advertising not only welcome, but sought out. Solo is an orange soft drink with a history so deep in Norway, its branded fashion accessories have become a retro hip fashion statement. To capitalize on this chic, Solo built an app that helped people get more Solo gear. It recognized whenever someone was near Solo advertising—whether it was a TV spot, digital ad, or at a live event—via hidden sound scans. Each time a user’s phone recognized an ad, the user was entered into a drawing for Solo gear. Users who didn’t win could collect 10 sound scans to get a free Solo. Users were also entered into a weekly drawing if they took a selfie wearing Solo gear and posted it to Instagram, resulting in 30,000 photos. Solo turned a demand for fashion into demand for its soda with a mobile marketing masterstroke.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • Solo’s sales increased by 2% and “value” increased by 10%, meaning more people were buying Solo at a higher price
  • The campaign reached 84% of the youth market in Norway
  • Solo counted 160,000 app downloads
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My Heartbeats

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My Heartbeats


MULLENLOWE PROFERO
ORANGE
BEST INTERACTIVE EXPERIENCE AND BEST IN SHOW CAMPAIGN, IAB ROMANIA MIXX AWARDS

To impress the 18- to 35-year-old urban market on Valentine’s Day, telecom Orange turned consumer’s heartbeats into marketing media. It built a mobile app empowering users to send the sound of their beating hearts to the person they love. It worked like this: Using the My Heartbeats app, users put a finger over their phone’s camera to record their heartbeat. The app then turned it into a 10-second recording to share. For doing so, the users received free Mbs of data, 10x more than their actual recorded heart rate. To publicize the app, Orange produced posters, interactive outdoor, display banners, social media marketing, and a high-tech print ad in which users could push two buttons to record their heart rate.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • The app was downloaded 583,000 times
  • 5 million heartbeats were sent and received
  • 2.8 million GB of free data were earned by Orange customers
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Паша Логинов. МегаФон (Pasha Loginov. MegaFon)

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Паша Логинов. МегаФон (Pasha Loginov. MegaFon)


RE:EVOLUTION
MEGAFON
BRAND STRATEGIES & OBJECTIVES, PRODUCT LAUNCH, IAB RUSSIA MIXX AWARDS 2016

A grating, high-rotation TV commercial for a new MegaFon tablet created an uproar of unhappiness online. The brand needed to turn sentiment around fast, at the speed of digital. The spot featured a child, Pasha Loginov, loudly whining directly into the camera, pleading with his parents for the device. Viewers revolted online, creating a wave of negative feedback. To restore its image and still sell tablets, MegaFon created a new video that featured the same kid, but this time, it called out screen names of the internet users who disparaged the original. Then it made an account for the boy in social networks and hired a team to respond 24/7 to comments. Soon consumers were responding in droves. Then the team made more content, creating new memes and branded user-generated content. Within two weeks, the brand received double the number of positive responses than negative ones, and soon tablet sales picked up, too.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • The campaign resulted in 50% increase in sales above the goal
  • It produced a 55% increase in the number of tablet orders in the online store
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Peugeot TweetCar

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Peugeot TweetCar


VODEN
PEUGEOT
GOLD, EXPERIMENTAL AND INNOVATIVE, IAB TURKEY MIXX AWARDS 2016

Peugeot empowered attendees of Turkey’s Auto Show to control a Peugeot 308 by tweet in order to be the most remarkable brand of the show. But the team did its job so well, Peugeot’s message extended far beyond the limits of the convention center. Via a mobile website and Twitter, users could flash the car’s brights, turn on its flashing lights, and make it perform other operations, all without touching the car. The impact of this innovation was felt far beyond the time and place of the stunt.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • 70% of all Tweets about the auto show were about Peugeot and its TweetCar
  • 6.2 million people were reached by the campaign
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Feel Wimbledon

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Feel Wimbledon


MINDSHARE UK
JAGUAR UK
BEST INTEGRATED CAMPAIGN, MOST CREATIVE USE OF DATA, MOST CREATIVE USE OF AN EMERGING TECHNOLOGY, IAB UK CREATIVE SHOWCASE AWARDS 2015

Through the use of cutting-edge biometric and atmospheric data, Jaguar—a first-time Wimbledon sponsor hoping to boost brand fame and social engagement—fueled a breathtaking content experience. It gave everyone the unique and powerful experience of attending Wimbledon. Attendees wore bracelets that tracked their heart rate variability and audio; sensory beacons in the stands captured crowd energy levels; and a team studied live sentiment from social media. Then data analysts, designers, and motion graphic experts, among others, produced custom content every 20 minutes, capturing and sharing the actual excitement of the games. This content was then broadcast on out-of-home media targeted to commuters, and published through bespoke social posts on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, and on the Feel Wimbledon website. Digital media and the deft use of data extended the intensity of an exclusive event to life for all to enjoy, just as Jaguar provides a unique sensory and emotional experience to all of its drivers.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • #FeelWimbledon was the most used hashtag of any partner brand
  • Jaguar achieved a 27% share of voice on Twitter
  • The videos were viewed over 1.5 million times
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The Video Effect: Leveraging the Power of Video to Connect With Consumers

Shark Dive

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Shark Dive


LEO BURNET AUSTRALIA
SAMSUNG GEAR VR
FIRST PLACE IN IAB AUSTRALIA'S CREATIVE SHOWCASE ROUND 9.5

Digital media can take you anywhere in the world—even transporting you from the middle of a desert, 800 miles from the ocean, to an awe-inspiring shark dive ending inside a shark’s mouth. That was the remarkable virtual reality experience Samsung gave consumers, at a pop-up desert dive store, to demonstrate its Samsung Gear VR headset and Galaxy Note 4. To expand the influence of the event further, the marketing team created a video of users’ reactions, which was watched nearly two million times across Facebook and YouTube.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • The video of the experience was watched 1.8 million times
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Life is a Beautiful Sport

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Life is a Beautiful Sport


BETC, HAVAS MEDIA
LACOSTE
GRAND PRIX EFFIE FRANCE 2015

Lacoste is an iconic brand, but it was struggling to find its place in the fashion world in terms of its price-point competition and its image. The solution was to increase its digital spend from five percent to 30 percent, and to produce striking content activated not only in fashion magazines and its website, but also through Vine and Snapchat. The centerpiece of the campaign was a video titled “Le Grand Saut/The Big Leap” where a man reaches across a café table to kiss a woman, and the intensity of the moment is illustrated by interspersed clips of him jumping off a roof. On Vine, Lacoste partnered with an influencer who had three million followers to promote the launch of its new website. As the first fashion advertiser on Snapchat, Lacoste produced videos with hidden crocodiles asking users to #SpotTheCroc. Emotionally memorable video content presented in a modern and forward-thinking manner helped Lacoste rediscover its niche in the competitive fashion landscape.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • Sales volume jumped 8% from 2014
  • Commercial growth extended to multiple product styles: up 60% for leather goods, 33% for footwear, and 4% for textiles
  • Lacoste reached figures higher than competing brands for recognition, consideration, and purchasing
  • “Le Grand Saut” attracted 24 million views on YouTube
  • The Vine and Snapchat activations generated more than nine million views
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Das Große Osterhasen-Rasen (The Great Easter Bunny Race)

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Das Große Osterhasen-Rasen (The Great Easter Bunny Race)


OGILVY GERMANY
MEDIA MARKT MANAGEMENT GMBH
GOLD CROSS MEDIA CAMPAIGN, DEUTSCHE DIGITAL AWARD
GOLD GLOBAL FESTIVAL OF MEDIA
GRAND PRIX EUROBEST 2016

With its “Great Easter Bunny Race,” German electronics store Media Markt turned omnichannel marketing into omnipresent marketing. How? With a first-ever live sporting event broadcast as a commercial break simultaneously across nine TV networks, YouTube, Media Markts’ website, and the popular German website, Bild. Yes, nine rabbits racing down a track attracted more viewers than the World Cup semifinal. But it wasn’t just the cute bunnies and all of the adorable lead-up content—like training videos and collector cards—that appealed to viewers. All Media Markt receipts had a number that correlated with a bunny, and if that bunny won, the customer would get 50 percent of their money back—a winning strategy.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • 21 million people watched “The Great Easter Bunny Race”
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Social Trailers

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Social Trailers


CIRCUS, MEXICO
NETFLIX
BEST IN SHOW, GOLD FOR CONTENT, GOLD FOR CREATIVE INSPIRED BY DATA, IAB MEXICO MIXX AWARDS 2016
BRONZE, CANNES LIONS 2015

To make Netflix’s new releases a must-see across Latin America and Brazil, Netflix used social media to disrupt the traditional advertising construct that aims to make every movie and TV show a must-see: the trailer. Based on the premise that trailers are not trustworthy—but friends are—Netflix asked its vast social network for their opinions of movies, and then produced new, animated trailers inspired by more than 9,000 of these authentic voices. One commenter said “[The Wolf of Wall Street] is pure madness! Parties, women, drugs, sex, and more parties!” Another: “Mad Men is a catalogue of modern furniture.” The resulting refreshingly honest trailers, enabled and distributed by digital media, successfully attracted audiences to the target content. The promoted titles led the Netflix most-watched rankings for weeks.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • Fans made 36,000 comments about the new trailers
  • The trailers generated 683,216 views and 38,000 likes
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Mistakes

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Mistakes


CLEMENGER BBDO, WELLINGTON
NZ TRANSPORT AGENCY
GRAND PRIX AD STARS 2015

Sometimes a video is so emotionally powerful, thought-provoking, and full of the potential to inspire positive change that the world races to see it—not because of creative distribution techniques or promotional efforts, but because of the strength of the story itself. “Mistakes” takes viewers to the poignant moment right before an inevitable car crash, in which a parent and child are hit by someone speeding. The action freezes right before impact. The drivers get out of their cars. The parent pleads with the speed-demon to stop, but the speeder says there’s nothing he can do, that the parent pulled out of nowhere. And then they get back into their cars, and continue on to a terrible, heart-wrenching collision.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • The most viewed video in New Zealand, ever
  • It was translated into German, Polish, Arabic, Russian, Spanish, Slovak, Greek, and Mandarin. Agencies in other countries produced their own versions
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Smutny Autobus (Sad Bus)

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Smutny Autobus (Sad Bus)


K2 INTERNET S.A.
POLAND MINISTRY OF THE INTERIOR
BEST IN SHOW, IAB POLAND MIXX AWARDS 2015

Poor, poor sad bus—it’s falling apart. No one wants to ride on it; it knows it pales in comparison to newer models. It cries. And it attempts to commit suicide by riding on a conveyor belt to a car crusher. Briefly a butterfly from the junk yard brightens its spirits and turns off the belt. But just as it decides to live, a mom turns the belt back on and the poor, poor sad bus is crushed, spreading the message that there’s no mercy for the decrepit buses used to transport children around the country. This cartoon video produced by the Ministry of the Interior was intended to tell parents about its new service for revealing the safety records of the buses used for transporting their children. At the time more than 60% of the buses registered in Poland were more than 14 years old.

The video went viral. Viewers created Sad Bus T-shirts, a Sad Bus mobile game, and other gadgets. The mainstream news media not only replayed the video, it derided the video makers for killing the bus, adding to an already growing storm of controversy. And others? They used the Ministry’s online service and got dangerous buses off the streets.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • Police impounded 5,000 buses, 100 percent more than the prior year
  • 31% of internet users in Poland knew about the campaign, making it the third most recognizable social campaign in Poland
  • More than a quarter of parents with school-aged children who saw the campaign visited the site
  • During the holidays, nearly 35,000 buses were checked via the service
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Videoclips

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Videoclips


NOTABLE / ORIENTAL FILMS
CLARO
IDEA OF THE YEAR, GOLD FOR ONLINE CAMPAIGN, IAB URUGUAY MIXX AWARDS

Music videos aren’t just ads for the musicians, they’re content marketing for digital music platforms. And digital music platforms aren’t just apps, they’re marketing tools for reaching the youth market. This is roughly the equation behind this campaign in which Claro Musica, a digital music platform from telecom Claro, produced high-quality music videos for burgeoning local artists to attract new users, and subsequently more young, pre-paid cell phone users. Launched during the back-to-school season, the music videos were supported by social media, banners, and direct response efforts, bringing tens of millions of views to Claro Musica’s YouTube channel. This awareness translated to users, Claro Musica became one of the most listened to platforms in Uruguay and Argentina, and to buyers. Claro exceeded its sales goals.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • Pre-paid sales saw a 12% increase from the previous period, from 57,000 units to
  • 64,000 units. The goal was 62,700 units
  • Videos received 32 million views on YouTube
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