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IAB MIXX Awards 2016 Insights Report: What Works & Why in Digital

Celebrating Groundbreaking Creativity and Technical Innovation

IAB MIXX Awards 2016 Insights Report: What Works & Why in Digital 2It wasn’t so long ago that digital was the exception in advertising, not the rule. Fast-forward to today and digital is advertising.

The work celebrated at the 2015 IAB MIXX Awards showcases this profound shift in the advertising landscape. For the past 11 years, the IAB MIXX Awards has celebrated the year’s best in interactive advertising—beginning with experimental campaigns that tested out the ABC’s of interactivity, and now, more than a decade later honoring sophisticated campaigns that demonstrate mastery in using both creativity and technology to build deep relationships with users. Today’s winning work, which we call The Master Class, teaches the ecosystem of brands, publishers, agencies, and technology companies how to use marketing communications effectively.

This, the third annual What Works and Why in Digital: IAB MIXX Awards Insights Report, presents these lessons directly from the mouths of the illustrious jury who selected the winning work. This elite cross-industry panel of 39 judges consists of creative luminaries, brand marketing powerhouses, and blue-chip publishers at the top of their game. No other awards in our industry brings together so many experts from so many different disciplines—and the result is a unique look at what works and why in digital marketing. We’re honored to have these illustrious experts share with us what inspired them during the judging process, what they think stands out most about each execution, and what they believe the future holds for our industry.

By reading this report, you’ll learn how the creators of The Master Class embraced new technologies and breakthrough applications of data to tell moving stories that inspired people to action. The insights shared delve into the strategic thinking behind work so powerful that it revolutionized what is meant by the word “scale,” forced even critical audiences to fight back tears, and literally, purposefully, broke the internet.

Collectively, the campaigns highlighted in this report represent the finest in digital marketing, work that will surely influence the next generation of advertising campaigns. In short, this is innovation that begets innovation.

I hope the insights in this important report inspire you as they have inspired me. I can’t wait to see what the future holds for all of us.

Sincerely,
Randall Rothenberg
President & CEO
Interactive Advertising Bureau

Digital Insights: Digital Leaders Detail What Makes this Work Part of the Master Class

Five Digital Leaders Reflect on Digital Today and Tomorrow

Q: The digital advertising industry is maturing. How would you describe the state of advertising today? What does this mean for its future?

Advertising Is: Offering value
Twenty years ago, everything was magical and new. Ads didn’t feel intrusive. Now that world is upside down. People can easily avoid ads, and interactive ads haven’t gentrified. As an industry, we have to remember that we are talking to an intelligent and active audience. They will engage, but we have to offer them something of value.
— Edu Pou, Chief Creative Officer, The Barbarian Group

Advertising Is: Shifting from disruption to discovery
Advertising is going through a fundamental shift from disruption to discovery. Disrupting people’s viewing habits is much more difficult today. People have infinite choice, and they are looking for relevance and reward. To be relevant, advertising needs to create value―whether it’s a story that makes you cry, content that helps you paint a fence, or something saves you $5 on gas. There’s a radical shift happening in the world of advertising from the theory of personalization to the practice of it. Advertising needs to manifest the best qualities of the brand, whether that’s through an app, technology, or a service that’s relevant to people.
— Mark D’Arcy, Vice President and Chief Creative Officer, Facebook Creative Shop

Advertising Is: Creating meaningful experiences
The state of advertising today is: anything is possible. We’re becoming more sophisticated with technology. We’ve moved away from the bells-and-whistles stage to a more minimalist state where technology takes a back seat and less is more. Rather than using all the tools we’re inundated with, we’re using just a few to maximum effect… The future comes back to creating more meaningful experiences with people. Brands are putting more thought into why they’re doing something, and as a result will have more impact.
— Matt Murphy, Partner/Group Creative Director, 72andSunny

Q: Is there any conventional wisdom about how technology and creative work together that we should challenge?

Yes, that technology and creativity are in conflict
We need to challenge the idea that technology and creative are in conflict. Creativity unlocks the value of technology and technology enables creative people. Technology and creative together should unlock the value of whatever media distribution they touch.
— Mark D’Arcy, Vice President and Chief Creative Officer, Facebook Creative Shop

They are not at odds
I don’t think technology and creative are at odds at all. At the end of the day, marketers are trying to make a connection, to get people to buy or feel something. Lots of elements of technology make that easier. Technology at its best makes things delightfully easy and simple to consume, and the best technology just melts away.
— Linda Boff, Chief Marketing Officer, GE

They are part of the same thing
Technology and creative are part of the same thing. Data and tech are both a huge part of the creative process. Data lets us get smarter about what to develop and shows us what works and how. When data tells you something you don’t believe or agree with, the new role of creative is to listen.
— Erin McPherson, Former Chief Content Officer, Maker Studios

Together, technology and creativity make life better
Technology and creativity can solve real problems. Innovation as a canvas for gimmicks is just an ego trip. We, [advertisers], have to bring some empathy into our innovation and think about how we can use technology to make life more pleasant for people. When technology and creativity come together it feels natural, and we embrace it.
— Edu Pou, Chief Creative Officer, The Barbarian Group

But the idea must come before technology
You need an amazing idea and a strong strategy – and once you have that, then you can decide the role technology should play in bringing that to life. You may have an idea that doesn’t rely on any technology…Digital permeates everything we do, but you don’t always have to use technology to create radical experiences.
— Matt Murphy, Partner/Group Creative Director, 72andSunny

Q: What is one skill industry practitioners need to improve upon?

Listening
[Marketers] are very good at picking up the bullhorn, but we need to be better at listening to what consumers want. We also need a bit of bravery. We like to draw inspiration from each other and follow the leader. I’d like to see more advertisers zig when others are zagging.
— Linda Boff, Chief Marketing Officer, GE

Taking the long view
I’d like to see more of us including CMOs and CEOs to take the long view and not just think about the P&L and pushing messaging. [Marketers] need to think of consumers as a member of a community or tribe that loves a brand.
— Erin McPherson, Former Chief Content Officer, Maker Studios

Embracing new ideas
Our industry needs to embrace optimism, playfulness and creativity. The internet today is where TV was in the 50s. Only by playing and reinventing can we uncover best practices and realize the full value of a medium’s potential.
— Mark D’Arcy, Vice President and Chief Creative Officer, Facebook Creative Shop

Acting from the heart
A passion for the craft. Execution matters, and you have to love what you do… but brands also have a responsibility to contribute to people’s lives with the work we do.
— Edu Pou, Chief Creative Officer, The Barbarian Group

Q: How do you balance risk-taking creativity and innovation with driving measurable results?

Define success upfront
Ask what success looks like when figuring out your metrics for success. Are you trying to be bold? Are you trying to affect culture? Clients are risk-averse, but to be bold or change culture, you have to take risk. Having that conversation upfront can make it easier to be calculated when taking risks, and the rewards can be grander.
— Matt Murphy, Partner/Group Creative Director, 72andSunny

Bring measurement into the creative process
The most important thing is not to divide creativity and measurement. One supports the other. Analytics need to be embedded in the creative department. If you want to do something amazing that serves a purpose, measurement and results shouldn’t be a burden—it’s part of the job. If it’s not, you’re doing it wrong.
— Edu Pou, Chief Creative Officer, The Barbarian Group

Measure innovation as a KPI
Innovation needs to be more than just lip service, more than just something you do for an award. Innovation needs to be on the same KPI sheet as all measurable returns. If you don’t prioritize it, it won’t just happen. Innovation needs to be a measurable goal, and we need to assess and reward innovation openly and as part of people’s compensation packages. As an industry we also need to learn to embrace failure—that’s part of innovation.
— Erin McPherson, Former Chief Content Officer, Maker Studios

Q: What untapped opportunities should the industry embrace in 2016 and beyond?

Super users
Consumers, especially younger ones, love brands and talk about them openly. Instead of hiring celebrities as spokespeople, brands have an opportunity to listen to who’s already loving their product. There are millions of people already taking pictures of your product―the next step is to find and nurture these super users. These are people who already love your brand and aren’t just promoting it for money―they’re authentic. They produce better ROI and more lasting results, and the people they reach are worth more. Technology can help brands find those micro influencers at scale.
— Erin McPherson, Former Chief Content Officer, Maker Studios

Mobile
Mobile is still profoundly underestimated. If you look at the numbers for where we are and where we are going, no matter how fast we think we are moving in mobile, it’s not fast enough. Mobile is the central connection between brands and people. The role it plays in our lives is around the things that matter, like decision-making, experiences, and stories. The next billion people on the internet will arrive via mobile. If you’re not building everything around mobile, somebody else will be―and it may not turn out so great for your company.
— Mark D’Arcy, Vice President and Chief Creative Officer, Facebook Creative Shop

Personal communications
We have the illusion that advertising is more specific or tailored to audiences, that we know how to talk to people at the right time with the right message. Some of that is true, but we’re still missing the boat. We’re using old templates for new scenarios. We can’t use the same techniques for a billboard or TV ad as we use for more intimate conversations. We need a dramatic change of language to serve specific audiences—and we need to rediscover the language of advertising for different channels. On the other hand, if we use empathy as a driver, the solution will be the right one.
— Edu Pou, Chief Creative Officer, The Barbarian Group

Storytelling and Simplicity Ignite for Global Big Bang

Behind the Scenes with the IAB MIXX Best-in-Show Winner: ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

It’s tempting to think of the extraordinary success of “The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge” as pure luck—but that would be a mistake. A close look at what brought this campaign to life reveals a combination of marketing genius and brilliant strategic thinking.

Background: Seizing an Opportunity

Despite what you may think, people were pouring ice water over their heads in online videos before the “The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge” began—but it hadn’t yet reached meme status. The act had no name, no hashtag, no infrastructure. This was the rare and fleeting opportunity that Pat Quinn, co-creator of “The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge” remembers seizing with co-creator Pete Frates. The pair gave the activity a name, a hashtag, and a deeper reason for sharing—to support ALS, a disease with which both men had been diagnosed. Next, the two men posted the challenge to their personal social networks, told their friends what to do, and let go. That’s how the real zeitgeist got started.

IAB MIXX Awards 2016 Insights Report: What Works & Why in Digital 1

Inspiration: Winning Hearts and Minds

“We made it easy to be part of something bigger—and we put faces and names to the movement by giving people the opportunity to put themselves out there,” Quinn says.

The “ALS Ice Bucket Challenge” had all of the basic elements of work intended to go viral, yet was then super-powered by the activity’s existing momentum, its authentic creation story, and the unusual chance for people to make a difference easily.

Quickly the campaign spread from the personal accounts of two activists to countries around the world. Celebrities, politicians, pop stars, actors, athletes, chief executives, and hundreds of thousands of friends and fans were dumping buckets of ice water on their heads to raise awareness for a disease that hadn’t had a champion since Lou Gehrig in 1939.

IAB MIXX Awards 2016 Insights Report: What Works & Why in Digital

Strategy: Real-Time Storytelling

Everyone who took the challenge made the experience their own, tapping into the true potential of interactive media. The stories captured were hilarious, awkward, surprising, always off-the-cuff and always heartfelt. Quinn and Frates took control of the meme to launch the campaign, but then they also took the ultimate risk: they let go, handing the reins to the people.

Results: #Winning

To date, “The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge” has raised a staggering $220 million for The ALS Association. It is likely the most successful non-profit marketing effort of all time. The real payoff may not be the donations, however. “The visibility that this disease is getting as a result of the Challenge is truly invaluable,” says Barbara Newhouse, CEO of the association.

To Innovate, Remember to Keep Exploring What We Don’t Know

Insights from MIXX Jury Chair, Michael Lebowitz, Founder and CEO, Big Spaceship

We’re at a crucial moment in history for our industry, and I’m worried that we’re getting a little too good at this. Nothing stands still for long and complacency is the enemy.

Here’s what I mean: Twenty years ago at the outset of the commercial web there were no best practices. The tools were terrible. There were no standards and the browsers were awful. But our attitude was “Let’s figure this out.” And we did figure it out. It was a powerful thing.

Carry that forward to today and we’re in a world where we have so many tools, so much technology, and even more data than ever—and that’s where the danger lies.

All too often, we think we’ve figured out interactive advertising, and in many cases we have. It’s no longer an experimental field with agencies fighting for pennies to demonstrate the worth of the medium. Digital is part of everything we do now, and a handful of platforms and technologies have led the media for years. But we can’t rest.

This year, the IAB MIXX Awards 2015 Gold Winners showed a deep understanding of what works and why in digital advertising, and yet they also broke the mold. They embraced new technologies and new applications of data to tell moving stories. They inspired people not just to action, but participation. They challenged pronouncements about what the industry is and isn’t—and what conflicts and relationships define it—to break new ground.

This year’s MIXX Awards Best in Show winner in particular, the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, seized the kind of opportunity I’m talking about. Instead of buying their way into people’s consciousness, they saw an opening to tap into something in an organic way and add an accelerant.

The ALS campaign took an idea and made it humorous, fun, and replicable. Instead of finding a formula that everyone else has tried, they found something familiar that was ritualistic, repeatable, and in tune with human behavior and our culture—and that was also different each time someone participated and that people wanted to share. The ALS campaign captured the power of what’s possible by finding ways of existing inside culture naturally, instead of trying to take a primary role.

Yes, the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge was a special case for a great cause, and it won’t be easy for brands to capture that kind of success. But it illustrates just one of the ways we should be looking for interesting ideas and frameworks and to be part of the conversation.

Jeff Bezos has this wonderful quote: “Your brand is what people say about you when you’re not in the room.” Too much of our work today focuses on interrupting people and grabbing their attention while we’re in the room. We should think of our work as the fuse―and what happens next is where the interesting and explosive opportunities happen. It’s a big mental shift.

Consumer expectations of online experiences are constantly changing. We must tirelessly innovate and elevate these experiences to make meaningful and lasting connections with people.

The key is to remember what we don’t know—and keep exploring.

Michael Lebowitz is the Founder and CEO of Big Spaceship and chaired the 2015 IAB MIXX Awards jury.

What Inspires the Experts

Judges Perspectives: Themes and Concepts Explored by the Digital Experts

MIXX Awards judges give their perspectives on dominant themes that emerged from the year’s award-winning Master Class



















Selected Campaigns: Selections from the Creative Master Class

These are the 2015 MIXX Awards winners that demonstrate the progress and depth of expertise needed to produce the best of the best digital work

Enormous & Calculated Risk

Work in which the creators took intelligent leaps of bravery to meet and exceed their goals

Taco Bell Blackout

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Taco Bell Blackout


DIGITASLBI SAN FRANCISCO | TACO BELL
GOLD WINNER
PRODUCT LAUNCH

Taco Bell spent close to two years developing its mobile ordering app and was at risk of lagging behind competitors like Chipotle and Starbucks. To catch up, Taco Bell needed 2 million new users for its app immediately. On October 28, 2014, at 12am, Taco Bell’s Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Facebook, Vine, Google+, and Tumblr accounts, and tacobell.com disappeared. Conversations were cut off. Screens went black. Each disappearing act was executed to feel natural to the environment, requiring Taco Bell and DigitasLBi to work closely with each platform’s product teams. The only message: “The new way to Taco Bell isn’t on (insert appropriate social channel name), it’s #OnlyInTheApp.” Boom. Paid social media ads—black squares with the #OnlyInTheApp message—helped drive even more buzz. The stunt left fervent Taco Bell fans hungrier than ever, proving that the fastest way to your audience’s attention is to take something away.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • 300,000 + individual app downloads in 2 days
  • 2.6 million individual app downloads in total
  • 2 billion impressions in 3 days
  • $7.5 to $10 increase in average check size of customers who downloaded the app
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Dream Team

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Dream Team


WUNDERMAN UK | THE SUN
GOLD WINNER
DATA-INSPIRED CREATIVE

In England, football fans swear lifelong allegiances to a single team. It is a cultural sin to support anyone else. But what data scientists behind Dream Team, one of the largest fantasy football leagues in the UK produced by The Sun newspaper, found is that their country is awash with sinners. Users were regularly selecting players from across the whole league—even choosing star football players from their most hated rivals—to build their ultimate make-believe teams. The revelation of this taboo was the creative impetus for The Sun and Wunderman’s jaw-dropping campaign. It all started by launching the poignant and curious message, “It’s not cheating when it’s your Dream Team,” across print, social, digital, email, direct mail, and film. The message was supported by content showing football fans dealing with the guilt of betraying their beloved team. Audiences were invited to share their sins using the hashtag #DTConfessions. But phase 2 was the kicker—The Sun actually called out the cheaters. Using social and real-time data, the brand unapologetically called out cheating fans on social channels, inviting them to confess their footballing infidelities. The team then collated this data into ‘cheater of the day’ infographics. The crafty insight and intimate surprises rocketed engagement with the app.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • 636,596 players acquired (6% over target)
  • 94,923 chairmen set up mini-leagues (23% over target)
  • 16,709,763, total reach on social media
  • 3 consecutive days hashtag #DTConfessions trended UK-wide
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Adoptable Trends

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Adoptable Trends


DIESTE | DALLAS PETS ALIVE
GOLD WINNER
SEARCH MARKETING

Each year, 27 million dogs are euthanized in the U.S. because they lack the attention and exposure they need to find a permanent home. To increase these dogs’ chance of adoption, Dallas Pets Alive, a non-profit dedicated to saving the lives of shelter dogs, and agency Dieste, tapped into something that does get a lot of attention—trending topics. To divert this attention to their cause, the organization renamed shelter dogs after the hottest and most searched trending topics at the moment, from Miley Cyrus Twerking and Kim Kardashian’s Butt to Interrupting Kanye, and promoted them through SEM and the site adoptabletrends.com. Every time a new trending topic popped up, the team renamed another dog waiting for adoption and put it at the top of search results. To help spread the word, the concept was also narrated in a fun and hilarious online film. Soon needy pups that would have been unknown and unloved became part of real-time conversation in social media—and adopted.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • 200% increase in adoptions per year
  • 98% increase in traffic to the site
  • 3 to 1 increase in AdWords click-through rate
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The Last Game

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The Last Game


WIEDEN+KENNEDY | NIKE
GOLD WINNER
ONLINE COMMERCIAL

Every four years Nike amps up its efforts to connect with footballers for the World Cup. In 2014, Nike and Wieden+Kennedy chose the message “Risk Everything” to inspire athletes to play the fun, exciting football everyone loves, and not to play it safe. To bring this notion to life, they depicted what happens when order and apathy trumps ambition and hustle through a 10-minute high-quality, animated video, called “The Last Game.” Football advertising had become dark and serious. This short film aimed to show every kid that Nike stood for fun, phenomenal play. The only place to see “The Last Game” uninterrupted in its entirety was online. The rollout occurred in phases, beginning by promoting it to Nike’s most committed community, then spreading to its social channels, and eventually appearing in the largest digital advertising placements. In 2014, with the brightness of Brazil filling screens around the world, the video connected perfectly with the image of the game.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • 2nd most viewed 2014 YouTube ad
  • 6 million increase in followers of Nike Football's community
  • 1 million total downloads of Nike Football app
  • 2nd most shared video after launch, on Facebook
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Androidify

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Androidify


PHD | GOOGLE
GOLD WINNER
INTERACTIVE OUT-OF-HOME

The Android operating system runs billions of mobile devices, yet many people don’t know what it is or what it does. In 2014, Google and PHD sought to drive awareness by creating a pop-up presence in Time Square themed “Be Together. Not The Same”—a perfect motif for a place where so many unique individuals from dozens of countries cross paths every day. To succeed in one of the most concentrated out-of-home locations in the world, the campaign either needed to go big or be massively innovative. Google and PHD did both, creating the largest interactive Ultra-HD out-of-home installation ever . The campaign invited visitors to Times Square from around the world to play with a variety of Android devices and simultaneously participate in one of the world’s largest multi-player games that was projected onto a Times Square screen. The campaign made the Android brand human, fun, and approachable. It also didn’t just plaster ads on screens for people to see—it invited them to become a part of creating the story.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • 9.8 million impressions generated by digital board
  • 90 million earned media impressions
  • 159 million users reached over social media
  • 150 countries represented by participants
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New & Superior Techniques

Work demonstrating such an understanding of “what works and why” that it defines innovative strategies and more effective tactics

The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

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The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge


THE ALS ASSOCIATION
GOLD WINNER
BRAND AWARENESS AND POSITION, PUBLIC SERVICE / BRAND CITIZENSHIP, SOCIAL

In the summer of 2014, ALS was a disease most famous for Lou Gehrig, a baseball star from the 1930s. Pete Frates, Pat Quinn, Anthony Senerchia—three men diagnosed with the disease—and their families decided to give degenerative, incurable illness a pick-me-up. They challenged themselves to build awareness through something light, fun and easy, that would leverage the power of the social media. Soon “The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge” flickered to life. The families dared folks to dump a bucket of ice water over their heads, post a video of it on Facebook, and then tag friends to do the same and donate money to The ALS Association. The user-generated videos were fun and engaging, and they spread like wildfire. Before long, Facebook feeds around the world were exploding with ALS Ice Bucket Challenge content. A cascade of politicians, pop stars, actors, athletes, chief executives, and hundreds of thousands of friends and fans were dumping ice water on their heads championing the disease. In the end, more people participated in the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge than watched the Super Bowl and Oscars combined—and hope for a better future for ALS patients was born.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • 440 M total views
  • 17 M fan-created Videos
  • 159 countries participated
  • $220 M raised
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Taco Bell Mobile Ordering App

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Taco Bell Mobile Ordering App


DIGITASLBI | TACO BELL
GOLD WINNER
BRANDED UTILITY, MOBILE, AND BRANDED MOBILE APPLICATION

Taco Bell encourages its customers to Live Más through its food and in their lives. The strategy behind the Taco Bell Mobile Ordering App by Taco Bell and Digitas began with a single, yet powerful insight: Approximately 70 percent of Taco Bell customers want to create custom orders, but less than 50 percent actually do so regularly because they feel anxious that they will hold up the line. To help customers get what they want, anxiety free, the team built a multi-faceted mobile app for ordering ahead that puts item customization at its core. In addition, it uses customer-inspired product photography; a patent-pending, one-step reordering method; in-app payment; and pick-up preferences. This is exactly what Taco Bell lovers needed to Live Más.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • 300,000+ app installs in first 2 days
  • 2.6 million total app installs to date
  • $7.5 to $10 increase in average check size of customers who downloaded the app
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IKEA #ShareTheBathroom

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IKEA #ShareTheBathroom


JUNGLE MEDIA | IKEA CANADA
GOLD WINNER
INNOVATIVE USE OF CREATIVE OPTIMIZATION AD TECHNOLOGY

The morning routine is chaotic for families who share bathrooms. Kids want to tell parents to stop reading their iPads on the toilet, and parents want to remind kids to pick up their wet towels off the floor—all in the moment. IKEA Canada and Jungle Media made making these morning demands much easier—or at least more innovative. The team created a campaign  that allowed users to vent their bathroom-sharing frustrations by creating a customized digital ad that would show up on the offender’s screen. It worked like this: Users would visit Ikea’s site, enter text that was turned into an ad. The ad would be instantaneously stored in a dynamic feed, along with the user’s household IP address. Using custom programs created by IKEA’s buying team, the IPs and custom banners were automatically turned into buying parameters in real-time. IKEA then programmatically bought ad space matching these IPs and delivered the appropriate custom ad to create a hyper-personalized ad for every member of the household.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • 17,000 total Canadians visiting the ad creation page during three week campaign
  • 800,000 total custom banner impressions served
  • 12+% bathroom sales increase (in-store)
  • 34+% bathroom sales increase (online)
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Axe Black – Bring the Quiet

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Axe Black – Bring the Quiet


MINDSHARE TURKEY AND MOBILIKE | UNILEVER / AXE BLACK
GOLD WINNER
DIGITAL AUDIO

The world is getting louder, according to Axe. To introduce Axe Black, a new fragrance for men aimed at making an impression without going over the top, Unilever, Mindshare Turkey and mobilike invited men to “Bring the Quiet” by highlighting the coolness of understatement in a noisy world. Via a mobile app, Axe measured the volume of users’ environments. When the loudness level exceeded 120 dB, consumers were shown a rich media banner on their mobile phones to “Bring the quiet!” inviting them to put on their headphones. When they did, they could listen to the acoustic music performed for “Axe Silent Movement.” This is the first time loudness-level detection has ever been used in a mobile rich-media campaign.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • 5 million impressions delivered by campaign
  • 25,000 consumers who saw the banner and listened to the music in their headphones
  • 6% of consumers who tapped to get more information (triple industry average)
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Yo! Test Ride

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Yo! Test Ride


RAZORFISH | SMART USA
GOLD WINNER
LOCATION-BASED ADVERTISING

This super-smart campaign from smart USA and Razorfish tapped directly into the community of people without cars, showed off the product in depth, and helped consumers to boot. 2014 was the summer of the Yo! app—a viral app in which people could send each other a “yo.” (It broke records gaining more than one million downloads in one day.) Seizing the momentum of the meme, smart USA took over two bus stops in San Francisco for a day and gave free rides to anyone that Yo!’d for one. A product expert chauffeured every car, able to answer any questions the passenger may have. The stunt itself was then turned into content for broader reach. smart USA proudly trumpeted the “world’s first Yo-powered test rides” and film from the rides resulted in an online video. What seemed like silly fun drove some serious results.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • 100,000 Total views of recap video
  • 581 consumers who contacted local dealerships for a test drive
  • Millions of free PR impressions driving broader brand awareness
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Sophisticated & Participatory Storytelling

Work that builds brands and inspires action by connecting with the human experience

#LikeAGirl

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#LikeAGirl


ALWAYS & LEO BURNETT CHICAGO, LONDON, AND TORONTO AND STARCOM MEDIAVEST GROUP | P&G
GOLD WINNER
BRANDED CONTENT, CROSS-MEDIA INTEGRATION, AND PUBLIC SERVICE / BRAND CITIZENSHIP

ION, AND PUBLIC SERVICE / BRAND CITIZENSHIP

During puberty, girls quickly go from believing they can take on the world to finding themselves with serious doubts. The common playground insult of being told you do something “like a girl” only reinforces these insecurities. The “#LikeAGirl” campaign from Always and Leo Burnett set out to change that. The team invited a group of girls, boys, men, and women to be filmed by prominent youth culture documentarian and director Lauren Greenfield, showing them realizing that doing things #LikeAGirl should be an awesome thing, not an insult. The powerful and emotional video was then seeded with key media, celebrities, and influencers to ignite the conversation. Organic support followed, flowing in from powerful female influencers including Melinda Gates, Elif Shafak (Turkey),  Vanessa Huppenkothen  (Mexico)  and more than 20 prominent worldwide female organizations, such as Global Fund for Women. The video and its supporting hashtag redefined what it means to be female into something positive, before puberty and beyond.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • 76+ million views across 150 countries
  • 4.7+ billion earned branch impressions
  • 1,100+ mass media placements in broadcast, online and print
  • 18 % increase in brand awareness
  • 92% increase in purchase intent
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Emily's Oz

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Emily's Oz


GOODBY SILVERSTEIN & PARTNERS AND MEDIAVEST  | COMCAST / XFINITY
GOLD WINNER
PRODUCT LAUNCH

Entertainment is universal; access to it should be as well. To promote the voice-guidance features available with Comcast XFINITY and Goodby Silverstein & Partner showed how rich, rewarding, and unique entertainment can be for someone who is blind. The campaign began with a young The Wizard of Oz fan named Emily, who has been blind since birth. The team worked with Emily to understand exactly what she sees in her mind’s eye when she experiences The Wizard of Oz. They then worked with Hollywood artists, set designers, and puppeteers to bring her spectacular vision to life. The result is “Emily’s Oz,” a six-minute documentary and three additional mini-documentaries that debuted during the Oscars. It wowed entertainment fans, increased awareness of Comcast’s accessibility technology, and created empathy and awe by revealing the hidden beauty one sees when they can’t see.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • 12 million total video views
  • 500 million total impressions
  • 91 million earned social impressions
  • 80 media outlets who covered campaign
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Pantene Praise Project

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Pantene Praise Project


WUNDERMAN GUANGZHOU | P&G / PANTENE
GOLD WINNER
MULTICULTURAL

In China, because of the one-child policy, women are under pressure to be everything—a good daughter, a perfect wife, a high-achieving student, and more. As a brand, Pantene strives to help women be confident and “shine strong” no matter what challenges they face. When Pantene applied these brand values to the position of women in China, a powerful campaign came to life. Pantene and Wunderman gave people the chance to praise the women they know who have paved their own path. The campaign centered on cards beautifully illustrated with people’s thumbprints that passed on messages of encouragement to women they admired. These messages were then also shared on social networks. But with Facebook and Twitter not available in China, Pantene had to use local social platforms like QQ and WeChat in a way that was respectful of regulations and not seen as promoting activism. This subtle approach made participants feel safe enough to lend their support, which in turn contributed to the campaign’s success.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • 126 million total campaign video views
  • 28 million total engagements on the Tencent QQ social platform
  • 10 million total of shares and likes of the praise cards through the campaign sites and on Tencent’s WeChat
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RE2PECT

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RE2PECT


JORDAN BRAND & WIEDEN+KENNEDY | NIKE
GOLD WINNER
CROSS-MEDIA INTEGRATION

Derek Jeter is an icon of the New York Yankees but his skills, work ethic, and sportsmanship also transcend the game. Even for rival fans, Jeter is the Yankee it’s okay to like. To honor Jeter’s retirement, Jordan Brand and Wieden+Kennedy celebrated this unique cultural moment by giving fans around the world a simple way to pay their respects to a legend who never let his sport—or his city—down. This campaign focused on the key moment of celebration: the 2014 Major League Baseball All Star Game, Jeter’s last hurrah on the national stage.  It starts with a video of Jeter adjusting the brim of his helmet as he always has at bat. The simple adjustment turns into much more as the crowd at Yankee Stadium begins to tip their hats in respect. Soon, everyone from Tiger Woods and Michael Jordan to Yankee haters tip their caps to Jeter. The 90-second clip soon went viral on Twitter as millions of fans paid their RE2PECT to the Yankee legend. Everything built towards Jeter’s first plate appearance, with a flood of digital, social, and PR activations drawing power from the emotion of the moment.

SELECT SUCCESS METRICS

  • 894,000 organic tweets with #RE2PECT during baseball season
  • 1.25 million total engagements on Instagram
  • 8.8 million total film views
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